I shared a reader’s assertion that there ought to be a cut-off age for new tech.  (He suggested 85. You can click here to read that article.)

Your response:  No way!

Bert replied:

“The original article is nonsense…I’m 86 and live in independent living with 2500 residents between 75 and 105. The 102 fellow just his latest book on a computer…and, while there are some holdouts, most folks here use at least a computer, an iPhone, iPad, and/or Android tablet or phone for calls, messages, email…etc.

In other words…these are the people of WWII, who saved the world from fascism, and who continue to be productive well into their later years…it’s the Great Generation and you can’t phase us out just yet. Just ’cause we can’t do things as fast as you young folks doesn’t mean we can’t do them.

Educate yourself about old folks today…you’ll find we just may have some things to teach you…especially about your attitude towards us.”

I want to point out that the age cut-off wasn’t my suggestion, but that of an 86 year-old-reader.  I made much the same point as Bert.

Jer says the key is persistence:

My being an 88 yr. old Senior Citizen hasn’t prevented me from adapting to the constantly changing technology that’s appearing almost monthly. Not only with computers of course.
My attitude has been “What can go wrong”, and I forge ahead and surprisingly nothing does go wrong. And if it does, I review the available instructions and start over again from there.Over 90% of the time I’m successful, and if not I’ll have learned somethings I hadn’t expected to that can be useful in similar circumstances.

Sharen says learning new tech is worth the trouble:

I’m 72 but I pick and choose what technology I want to use. I’ve been using computers since the early 70s when I became a programmer ( the Y2K type). I got bored and moved on to other occupations, lately a medical coder-just retired. It’s become way easier to use technology now, particularly if you get a good set of instructions. I’m having a difficult time trying to decide to cut the cord on my TV service though. I’m a nerd and I don’t watch movies, drama shows or sitcoms. Its science, medicine, news, history or DIY shows for me but many of the free or low-cost services don’t carry the stations I watch. Then, I have an old big flat screen TV that still works well but has no USB port. Technology upgrades are everywhere, Even my several sewing machines are computers so Its worth learning the basics. Don’t run away from technology it can help you immensely however you chose to use it. For someone who is handicapped or has mobility issues, it can truly can make your life much easier and may allow you to live independently much longer than without it.

Barb sums it up in a couple of sentences:

LOL…being a 78-year-old senior I completely understand, but as they say, you snooze, you lose. We’re never too old to learn, and yes it can be daunting and a hassle but I find it’s worth it. And thankfully there is help all over if you need it.
Go for it!

I know that the sterotype is that older folks are befuddled when it comes to tech, but in my experience, they are actually more patient and curious as to how and why things work the way they do. Kids who’ve grown up with technology are often the ones who pay the least attention to security and have zero patience for troubleshooting.

There’s no reason that anyone of any age should feel intimidated by tech. However, if this isn’t how you feel about new tech, I may be able to help. If you feel a little skittish about all the new stuff out there, I’d like to know what you have the most difficulty mastering. What don’t you understand at all? What’s the biggest roadblock to your feeling comfortable with new tech? Is there one particular thing that just has you flummoxed?

Let me know in the comments. I may be able to help.