Microsoft has made some big changes to the Edge Browser since its introduction back in 2015. Let’s take a look.  If you aren’t familiar with the browser, you can open it by clicking on the dark blue Edge icon. It looks somewhat similar to light blue Internet Explorer icon, so make sure you pick the right on.

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This browser can look a little sparse at first glance.

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It’s pretty easy to master the controls. To the left, you’ll see the tabs representing open pages, a Refresh button, and arrows to go backward and forward to previous web pages.

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On The right side, you’ll see the icons that control most of your actions in Edge.

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Click or tap the one that looks like three lines and you get this menu.

edge-menu-button

The icons on the menu represent some very familiar tasks. Click the star for your favorite sites, the one that vaguely resembles a stack of books is for the Reading List, the clock is for your browsing history, and the arrow shows downloads.

favorites-options-menu

Everything but Reading List should be pretty familiar to anyone who has used a browser.

Reading List is a neat little feature that allows you to add articles to make your own little magazine. To add an article, just
click the star icon in the address bar when you’re on the page that features the article. You’ll be asked whether you want to
add it to your favorites or to the reading list.

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We’ll continue our look at Microsoft Edge tomorrow is part 2 of our series.

~ Cynthia