With the recent announcement that Adobe is pulling the plug on Flash Player support in 2020, I’ve heard from a lot of you who love to play Flash Player games online on sites such as Pogo and Facebook. Why is it happening? Because Flash Player poses major security risks even with a fairly steady stream of security updates.

So does this mean it’s all over for Flash games? Here’s what Pogo has to say about the situation: First, they wanted to make it clear that they have no control over the end of support for browsers or for what happens to the Flash or Java platforms.

Flash and Java are what we call “platforms.”  It means that these games have been written in a language that only works with that platform. The commands written for a game program on the Flash platform will only work when you use the Flash program to play them.  If you want to create that game to work on another platform, you have to create that game over from scratch.

Here’s how long you can expect your favorite Flash games to still work with your browser.

Internet Explorer – IE will run Flash without asking for permission until the end of 2020. After that, the ability to run Flash will be removed from all supported versions of Windows.

Firefox – Starting in 2018, users will have to enable Flash each time they open the browser. In early 2019, a warning about Flash will display on any page that’s using it. Shortly after that, Firefox will disable Flash by default. In early 2020, Flash support will be removed from Firefox.

Google Chrome – Users can enable the Flash plug-in to run. Currently, support is scheduled to last until 2020

Microsoft Edge – Edge will ask for permission before running Flash content.  Starting in mid-2018, Edge will require permission each session to run Flash. In mid-2019, Flash will be disabled by default. At the end of 2020, it will be removed from Edge.

So does this mean it’s all over for Flash games? Here’s what Pogo has to say about the situation: First, they wanted to make it clear that they have no control over the end of support for browsers or for what happens to the Flash or Java platforms.

Pogo says they are currently working on bringing some of their Flash games over to the HTML5 format,  Among those games are Trizzle and World Class Solitaire. Plus, they’re working on new games in the HTML 5 platform.

Facebook says it will allow games to run until the end of 2020, but wants developers to move their Flash games to HTML5.

Whether or not game developers choose to create HTML5 versions of their games will probably depend on just how profitable the games are. Older, less popular games may be left in the dust.