Scammers never miss an opportunity to trick people out of private information. So, it’s no surprise that these crooks are using the upcoming election to target people.

Impersonating trusted government agencies is a favorite tactic of these criminals. Government imposter scams are an effective way to get people to part with information like their Social Security number. 

Ohio’s Attorney General Dave Yost warned voters about the problem. “Scammers follow the news and create variations of common scams based on current events,” Yost said. “Among other things, the public should be on guard for scams related to COVID, charitable donations, and the upcoming election in an attempt to defraud them of personal information and money through robocalls and text messages.”

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These crooks use typical phishing scam tactics like sending emails that attempt to trick you into clicking on what appear to be links for government agencies.

Click, and you’re taken to a fake site that can either steal your information or download malicious software on your phone or computer. Also be on the lookout for organizations that send messages that have an official look to them.

Legitimate government website addresses nearly always end in .gov or .us, while most political/non-profit organizations’ websites end in .org or .com.

Don’t anyone to pressure them into donating to any political organization. Take time to research and learn about the organization. If you do choose to donate, do it my debit card, credit card, or check.  Beware of anyone requesting a donation with a gift card, wire transfer, or prepaid money card. These are almost always scams.